Legends In Their Own Closing Time

In 1988, the Licensing Act which amongst other things, allowed pubs to stay open from 11am while 11pm, was introduced by Home Secretary, Douglas Hurd. The legislation was widely derided by the tabloid media, who screamed all kinds of Armageddon-esque rhetoric about the streets being full of drunkards seven days a week. As Peter Hitchens in the Mail on Sunday said in response to the legislation, “where men will not place chains upon their own behaviour, others have to do it for them”. Like the vast majority of other tabloid created hysteria, this didn’t materialise. If anything, the opposite was true. In the year of the legislation, Manchester United had an average attendance of 39,152 and in the 2014-15 season, a mean average of 75,334. Despite the fact that United’s average attendance has nearly doubled in the twenty seven years since the act was introduced, paradoxically the amount of pubs around the vicinity of Old Trafford has plummeted. In 1988 the A56/Chester Road, which is the busiest arterial road serving Old Trafford, had nineteen pubs/social clubs. Now it has four. In 1988 Hulme, a neighbouring district to Old Trafford, had twenty eight pubs within its boundary. Now with The Junction on Rolls Crescent and The Three Legs of Man on Stretford Road, it only has two.

The Pomona Palace, the last pub standing on Chester Road in Hulme. Demolished in January 2014

When Peel Holdings successfully applied for the demolition of the Pomona Palace in December 2013, the final pub on what was loosely known as Chester Road in Hulme vanished. To this writer, who grew up in the area, the thought of there not being a single pub on Chester Road was inconceivable as a child in the 1980s. In 1988, there were eight pubs in the half mile between the end of the Deansgate flyover and the border of Manchester and Trafford; now there are none. This isn’t necessarily down to the changing of people’s drinking habits, Continue reading Legends In Their Own Closing Time

Presented John Stones Roses – Liverpool 26th April 2015

It’s always good to be at Goodison Park. Along with Villa Park, White Hart Lane and Loftus Road, it’s a proper football ground in a proper footballing area. Like the aforementioned stadia, Goodison has houses, shops and pubs, glorious pubs nearby. Then we have St Lukes Church on the corner of Gwladys Street and Goodison Road, a place where you could pick up a drink and a butty for a reasonable price. I couldn’t believe how quaint and civilised it all was. Goodison isn’t perfect. The Bullens Road and Goodison Road stands are archaic, they have huge pillars which can occasionally block the view. However, compared to being stuck on the back row of the Anfield Road stand, it’s a relative minor inconvenience. Whatever imperfections of Goodison, give me there anyday over being stuck in a concrete bowl in the middle of bleeding nowhere. Like Stoke, Derby or the Riverside in Middlesbrough. Those places are so bland and dull that the rats give them a wide berth.

View from the back row of the Goodison Road stand’s upper tier

A final score of 3-0 looks bad, but to me, it was just one of those days. Manchester United were nowhere near as bad

Continue reading Presented John Stones Roses – Liverpool 26th April 2015